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Driving In Norway

The road network in Norway is fairly admirable. There are picture perfect roadways towards the South and excellent highways connecting important cities, but the roads in the Scandinavian wilderness and mountain ranges are poorly constructed. If you own a car, you can drive around the city suburbs, make day trips to the nearby fjords and venture into the countryside. If you do not own a car, you can use the extensive public transport options available here.

Cross country trips take a long while, and if you need to travel between cities, we recommend using the cheap Norwegian flight services instead of driving.

Mandatory Driving Rules

Norwegians driveon the right side of the road. There are strict regulations with regard to unsolicited parking, speeding (although if you cross the limit by a few readings, you are let off), drinking and driving, and using your cell phone while driving. Drivers have to be at least 18 years of age, have proper eye sight and a valid driving license.

Your cars must be insured suitably to cover external liabilities in the unfortunate instance of a car crash. The authorities recommend insuring your car against damage and theft, but that is an optional insurance. Car maintenance is very important in Norway and there are periodic inspection tests carried out to ensure that your car is drive worthy, especially, in the frigid climate and snow. Do not miss inspection tests: they are obligatory norms you should adhere to.

Most citizens in Norway are law-abiding and you'll find that people in traffic in Oslo and other cities to be calm and disciplined, something you rarely get to see in big cities like New York and London.

Driving Licence

You need to have a valid driving licence, either issued by the Norwegian authorities or procured from your home country, to drive around. Expats are given a one year timeframe to convert their licences into Norwegian driving licences.

Since Great Britain is a part of EU country association, the conversion process is fairly simple and does not require a driving/medical test if you have a clean driving record back home. You are to visit and consult with the Department of Motor Vehicles at [this site] www.vegvesen.no for more information.

We recommend initiating the licence conversion process as early as possible. There is a waiting list that extends to several months, at times. So, you want to make sure you get your licence altered before the one year grace time ends to be able to drive on the roads with no glitches.

Importing a Car

You will need to pay a considerable amount of money when importing cars to Norway. The number plate needs to be changed to a Norwegian plate, which requires you to register your car with the Road Authorities of Norway. To do that, you will need to pay the custom charges, import duty and VAT. You car will then be mechanically examined for its capacity to drive in the snow and rough terrain. Upon finding everything satisfactory, your car would be officially registered and you can take it out on the road.

For more information and forms to fill, you might want to look at www.toll.no

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